1/38. Hessische Berg- u. Hütten-AG, Wetzlar

1959 gab es in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland noch 156 Hochöfen an 38 Standorten. Alle Standorte und alle Hochöfen sollen in dieser Serie im Kurzportrait vorgestellt werden.

 

Hochofen 3, 1956

Hessische Berg- u. Hütten-AG, Wetzlar.
1959 waren in der Sophienhütte zwei Hochöfen in Betrieb:
Der Hochofen 1 mit einem Gestelldurchmesser von 3,8 m und der im Mai 1956 angeblasene Hochofen 3 mit einem Gestelldurchmesser von 4,5 m und einem nutzbaren Volumen von 408 m³. Beide wurden über Senkrechtaufzug und Setzkübel begichtet. Der Hochofen 2 wurde erst im Dezember 1962 in Betrieb genommen, zeitgleich wurde der Ofen 1 endgültig stillgelegt.
Die sog. “Berghütte” produzierte 1959 150.450 t Giessereiroheisen.
Die Roheisenerzeugung in Wetzlar wurde am 29.10.1981 beendet.

Hochöfen Wetzlar, 1962

 

 

 

British Steel Ltd.

former Tata Steel, Corus, British Steel Corp., Appleby Frodingham is on the verge of collapse.
Talks with the government on rescuing the steel group failed on Wednesday.
British Steel is owned by private equity group Greybull Capital, main products are rails.
According to Greybull shrinking orders due to Brexit-related issues and  difficult market conditions are to blame for the financial problems.

Blast furnaces Victoria, Anne, Bess and Mary.

Klöckner’s first blast furnace in Bremen

Hochofen 4 Klöckner, Bremen was put into operation 60 years ago in April 1959.
Blast furnace 4 had a hearth diameter of 6,5 m and was meant to be the first out of 8 furnaces originally planned.
The beginning of integrated steel making in Bremen already marked the end of iron production in Klöckner’s Haspe and Georgsmarienhütte works in the long term.

Blast furnace 4 was finally closed down in March 1979.

The Last Blast Furnace In Duisburg-Ruhrort.

Hochofen 6 Thyssen in Duisburg Ruhrort.
50 years ago August Thyssen Hütte AG built the largest blast furnace in Europe at its plant in Duisburg-Ruhrort.
Blast furnace 6 had a hearth diameter of 11 metres, a volume of 2200 m³ and a total height of 100 metres. It was relined and modernized in 1983. Less than two weeks after the commissioning of the second blast furnace in Duisburg-Schwelgern, blast furnace 6 was shut down on November 9, 1993.
One year later, the 19,000 ton blast furnace was dismantled and shipped to India.
In 2000, the blast furnace was put back into operation 30 km south of Mumbai at Nippon-Denro-Ispats Dolvi works. Now called Dolvi No. 1.
In 2010, Ispat was acquired by JSW Steel.
In 2016, the former blast furnace 6 was replaced by a new 4.323 m³ furnace in just 4 days using the so called single block method.

llanwern Blast Furnace No.3

llanwern steel works
One of the most short-lived fully integrated plants in the history of steel making was torn down 15 years ago.
Built by the Welsh steel maker Richard Thomas and Baldwins Ltd in 1962 the site became part of nationalised British Steel Corporation in 1967 and was called Llanwern works from then on.
In 1974 No. 3 blast furnace was the third to be built on the site and with it’s 11,2 m hearth and two tapping holes it was the first modern large volume furnace in Britain.
Furnaces No. 1 and No. 2 had a hearth diameter of 9,1 m.
Because of the lack of a deep-water iron ore unloading terminal the iron and steel making facilities, including  the three 175 t converters of the BOF shop, where closed down in 2001 after producing steel for less than 39 years.

The Blast Furnaces Of Gustave Boel

in La Louviere, Belgium where torn down 15 years ago in between August 2003 and September 2004.
The line of 6 units showed the entire development of blast furnace technology in the 20th century.
Usine Gustave Boel Hauts Fourneaux
Blast furnace 1, Ø 4,5 m, 1913.
Blast furnace 2, Ø 4,5 m, 1913.
Blast furnace 3, Ø 4,5 m, 1930.
Blast furnace 4, Ø 4,5 m, 1939.
Blast furnace 5, Ø 5,5 m, 1958.
Blast furnace 6, Ø 6,5 m, 1972.
Duferco La Louviere, Blast Furnace

DMKD, Ukraine

DMKD, Ukraine
The steel plant in Dneprodzerzhinsk was founded in 1887 on the banks of Ukraine’s largest river the
Dnepr supplied with coal from the Donezk bassin and iron ore from Krivoy Rog. The mill was nationalized in 1917 and named after Feliks Dzierżyński (Revolutionary and founder of the Sowjet secret police) in 1925.
Today the plant is privatized and runs four blast furnaces (No. 1/8/9/12) a BOF shop including two 250 ton top blown vessels. Two continuous casters and several rolling mills for railroad axles, rails, billets, tube blanks, medium sections and sheet pile.
Images now at Stahlseite.
DMKD Blast Furnaces